doug@janddfitness.com

Are We Talking About Practice?


     I recently had a work desk built for Tiffany, our operations manager, at the studio. It was a big deal as it marked a benchmark for the studio. As our operations manager, she handles all of the day-to-day issues outside of actually training such as scheduling of appointments for members, handling walk-ins, tracking inventory of our retail items etc. We’ve been open for 18 months and as we’ve grown the need for someone to handle these necessary tasks has become dire. As an entrepreneur you do your best to handle a lot of the odd & ends initially, but eventually you run out of time in the day. I personally came to a realization that my time was better spent training my coaches on strength and conditioning, working with members privately or in semi-private groups, and writing. It took us 18 months of a little chaos to know exactly how we needed the operations desk to be set up. We needed to have multiple consultations with prospective members. We needed to see where a good location for our retail should be. We had to have a set up that was functional for our needs. We had to go through this process to truly know what would work for us. The outcome is that Tiffany has a very efficient set up that works for both her & the members. After giving it some thought, isn’t that the way to approach almost anything? To initially go without and create a void, so when the opportunity arises you know what you need for certain.
 
     I look back on my personal training career and recognize that a large part of my job is to convince people to embrace the process of healthy eating and exercise. Squats, kettlebell swings, and TRX rows are the process to get them to where they want to be. Leaner thighs, defined mid-sections and bulging biceps are the outcome. The hours with me at the studio are the necessary process to get them to their outcome. If they aren’t willing to complete that process they will not get their desired outcome. This may sound like common sense, but many people never come to this understanding. I have never had a person come to me looking to be a master kettlebell instructor. I have had woman come to me looking to tone their glutes. I have a saying that the easy part is paying for the training. The hard part is what follows. 

     I had a client years ago who brought in a Men’s Health magazine showing me the cover photo of Gerard Butler after he filmed 300. Computer generated imagery (CGI as it’s commonly referred to) or not, Butler was in top shape for this movie. In the article, he discusses his complete obsession over exercise and eating that he had to do for 3 months in this role. He had to get into impeccable shape for the role and then maintain it during the filming. He trained 3 hours a day. He woke up in the middle of the night to drink protein shakes. They would film all day and train for 3 hours afterwards. He admits that he could only maintain a level of this ultra-intensity for a brief period. So back to my client, he shows me this and says “Let’s go for it”.  I try to explain to him that this is an extremely intense process, also one that is not healthy to maintain for the long term. Against my suggestions, we embark on this journey. 

     During our first workout he stops after a set to discuss his weekend. I tell him to hold that thought because I want to limit his rest time to 15 seconds. He tells me slow down, that we have time. I explain that to get his metabolism ramped up we need to watch his rest time intervals. He didn’t like that our normal chit-chat time got curtailed. 

     Next, I gave him a full-body circuit workout I wanted him to do 2 days a week outside of our 3 day a week workouts. Two weeks in I checked in to see how he was doing on these workouts. “Got busy with some other stuff, couldn’t get them both in.” The end to our experiment came when he took his wife out to breakfast and had a muffin loaded with butter with his meal. A food Nazi I’m not and I have adopted a balanced approach to nutrition that allows treats and rewards from time to time. In order to fulfill what he wanted though buttered muffins weren’t on the menu. I explained that we should keep to our prior program of getting stronger, leaner and improving his mobility at a more relaxed pace. He agreed and we throttled back some of the intensity. To get the extreme outcome he was looking for, he wasn’t willing to embrace the process it required. This was a big lesson to me. When goal setting with members and clients, I need to clearly draft a picture of what is required to get the end result they want. This picture usually includes 3 days a week of intense exercise for 45 minutes to an hour, including a diet rich in colorful vegetables and lean proteins.  I ask them to drink lots of water and together we come up with a strategy to deal with stress. 

     College basketball Hall of Fame Coach, Mike Krzyzewski, frequently discusses that one of his rules to building a championship team is getting them to embrace practice as part of the process. When someone comes to me looking to drop 20-25 pounds over a 3 month period, pushing sleds across turf, swinging ropes and kettlebells become part of the process. My recommendation is to try and enjoy the process. Make that one of your goals and the outcome you desire is sure to happen as a by-product.  I’ll see you at the studio.

J & D Fitness
4180 South Fort Apache Rd,
Las Vegas, NV 89147
702-892-0400